Parents Outraged Over Suburban High School Skit Depicting Slave Auction | NBC Chicago

Parents Outraged Over Suburban High School Skit Depicting Slave Auction

“Today we are going to have a Barrington bro for sale,“ one of the students was recorded saying

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    A weekend convention in the suburbs turned controversial because of a high school skit depicting a modern day slave auction. NBC 5's Christian Farr reports. (Published Sunday, Feb. 28, 2016)

    A weekend convention in the Chicago suburbs turned controversial because of a high school skit depicting a modern slave auction.

    Two Barrington High School students performed the skit Friday in front of an audience during the 2016 Illinois Junior Classical Convention, a Latin competition, at the Westin hotel in Itasca.

    The skit was performed during the "roll call" segment, in which each participating school sent delegates to the podium to introduce the school they were representing.

    Video of the skit showed one of the students with a chain around his neck. It ended with an auction winner.

    "Today we are going to have a Barrington bro for sale," one of the students was recorded saying.

    Kenwood Academy parent Danielle McDaniels, who was in the audience watching the skit, said she could not believe her eyes.

    "Watching a live slave auction, complete with chains, it was a bit much. It was overwhelming," McDaniels recalled.

    The Barrington School District apologized for the skit in a written statement.

    "Barrington School District offers sincere apologies to those offended by the actions of our high school students participating in the Illinois Junior Classical Convention this weekend. We understand the concern and are reviewing the incident with students and staff who were involved," school officials said.

    The teacher who coached the students also apologized afterward and was recorded as saying, "I am truly, truly sorry." A student involved in the performance expressed remorse the next day.

    Despite their apologies, some say more needs to be done.

    "The talks need to happen; they need to start by having cultural sensitivity," McDaniels explained.

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