Lolla Fan Backflips Off Bridge Into Chicago River

While the Lolla fan survived the jump, there are a number of dangers to jumping into the Chicago River

View Comments (
)
|
Email
|
Print

    NEWSLETTERS

    A man jumped off DuSable Bridge into the Chicago River after Lollapalooza. To see the full footage click here .

    Lollapalooza can get fans excited, but we don’t recommend doing what one fan did Saturday night.

    In footage posted to YouTube Monday, a young Lolla fan climbed over DuSable Bridge on Michigan Avenue and flipped backward into the river 30 feet below.

    After much goading from another person filming the video, the man, wearing a tank top and shorts with an American flag print, hopped over the railing and stood on the edge as anxious onlookers watched in shock.

    Witnesses can be heard in the footage telling the man not to jump.

    Grant Park Suffers More Damage Than Lolla 2013

    [CHI] Grant Park Suffers More Damage Than Lolla 2013
    Lollapalooza promoter, Chicago Park District still assessing conditions on muddy fields. NBC 5's Anthony Ponce reports.

    "Oh no, please don't do that," one person said.

    At one point a boat passes under the bridge and the jumper shouts “Oh hey,” at passengers.

    But after several deep breaths, the man jumps, flips backwards and lands in the water as a friend cheers from above.

    Keegan Goudie, who posted the YouTube footage to the website MajorOnions.com, said he met two men while walking home from Lollapalooza.

    Lollapalooza Day 3: Fans Get Muddy

    [CHI] Lollapalooza Day 3: Fans Get Muddy
    8/3/2014: Lollapalooza fans got muddy after Sunday showers drenched Grant Park on the final day of the festival.

    "I noticed one of them was soaking wet and I just started chatting with them," he said. "One of them said he had jumped off the bridge. I was like I do not believe that. I thought they were messing with me."

    The two sent him the video as proof.

    While the Lolla fan survived the jump, there are a number of dangers to jumping into the Chicago River.

    "I think they were still maybe just kind of getting off of the shock of doing it," Goudie said. "But I think they did later on recognize the danger of it... A lot of people have not survived doing something like that."