UPS Impersonator Robs Homeowner

Police: Crimes weren't random

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    NEWSLETTERS

    AP Images
    A real UPS delivery man would show up in the familiar brown truck.

    Two men, one dressed in a United Parcel Service uniform, forced their way into a Skokie home Monday morning, tied up their victim with duct tape, robbed the home and stole their victim's luxury SUV.

    The crime unfolded early Monday morning in the 4200 block of Suffield Court, and began with a call to the victim about a spa appointment he'd never made. Police said that call was intended to gather information to the robbery.

    Sometime between 9:30 and 10:30 a.m., a man posing as a UPS deliveryman knocked on the victim's door and said he had a package to deliver but needed a new pen, as his had gone dry. When the homeowner turned to get a pen of his own to sign for the package, the uniformed offender and a second man forced their way inside.

    "They basically tied the gentleman up with duct tape and proceeded to ransack the home, said Sgt. Michael Krupnik.

    Fake UPS Deliverymen Rob Skokie Man

    [CHI] Fake UPS Deliverymen Rob Skokie Man
    A Skokie man says he was tied by duct tape and had his home robbed and his car stolen by two men posing as UPS employees.

    Investigators said the robbers got away with tens of thousands of dollars in valuables and cash, stuffed into pillowcases, as well as a 2006 Mercendes Benz ML 350 SUV, which is still missing. The robbers also found a safe in the house, but were unable to open it.

    The victim was not injured, Jacobsen said. He was able to break loose from the duct tape and call police. The Mercedes, with an Illinois license plate of 890 9318, is still missing.

    The man who was wearing the UPS uniform was described as approximately 35 years old, between 5', 6" and 5' 8" tall, and about 160 pounds. His race was unknown. The other suspect was described as a black male, about 40 years old, approximately 5'9" and between 180 and 200 pounds.

    UPS said there are certain aspects of the crime which should have been dead giveaways that the man wearing their uniform wasn't legit.

    The company said that all of their drivers carry photo identification, and customers shouldn't be reluctant to ask to see them. Drivers will also never ask for ink signatures. Instead, customers sign for packages on electronic tablets using a stylus. And, of course, a real UPS delivery man will show up in the familiar brown truck.

    Police said they do not believe the crime was random.