Census Shows Chicago Population Growth

After a loss during the Great Recession, Chicago's population slightly increases

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Chicago may still be a city on the move, but these days, Chicagoans aren't moving like they used to.

    After about 200,000 residents left in the last decade, Chicago saw a slight increase in population, according to new U.S. Census Bureau numbers. 

    Census estimates show the city added about 11,500 people from 2010 to 2011 following a loss during the Great Recession. Most cities grew faster than suburbs last year, but analysts told the Chicago Tribune it's partially because most people couldn't afford to move.

    Another reason people are staying in Chicago, analysts said, is they're waiting longer to get married and have children, which usually means a move to the suburbs. Other factors include more job opportunities downtown for young professionals.

    On the other hand, Chicago's suburbs grew less during the last year. After growing by about 1 percent during the last decade, its growth shrunk between 2010 and 2011 by only 0.3 percent.