Another Chicago Mobster Goes Down for Tax Evasion

Fratto's name has come up at least twice in connection with organized crime in recent federal cases

By Andrew Greiner
|  Wednesday, Oct 14, 2009  |  Updated 8:27 AM CDT
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Another Chicago Mobster Goes Down for Tax Evasion

Al Capone's did all sorts of awful things, but he was caught for tax evasion.

Chicago's mob lore refuses to sleep with the fishes.

A reputed suburban Chicago mobster pleaded guilty Tuesday to federal tax evasion charges, the same offense that brought down Al Capone.

Rudolph "Rudy" Fratto, 65, pleaded guilty to a single charge of evading $30,052 in taxes on income of $199,595 for 2005. But he admitted in a signed plea agreement that he actually evaded $141,192 in taxes on $835,641 in income over seven years starting in 2001.

The maximum sentence on the charge is five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The plea agreement, however, said the sentence could be more like 12 to 18 months under federal sentencing guidelines.

Fratto admitted in his plea agreement that he had arranged to have income funneled into the bank account of a defunct company in an effort to evade the scrutiny of the Internal Revenue Service.

He received income in 2005 from jobs ranging from handyman to pasta salesman, according to the document.

Fratto's name has come up at least twice in connection with organized crime in recent federal cases.

Prosecutors introduced evidence that he was an associate of the Chicago police department's former chief of detectives, William Hanhardt, who is now serving a federal prison sentence as the leader of a mob-related jewel theft ring.

Fratto's name also came up in connection with the landmark 2007 Operation Family Secrets case — the biggest Chicago mob trial in decades. He was listed on papers prepared by the FBI as a serious threat to the safety of the government's star witness in the case, admitted mobster and hit man Nicholas Calabrese.

Fratto's name also appears on a chart published by the Chicago Crime Commission in 1997, showing the structure of the so-called Chicago Outfit.

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