1963 Photo of Bernie Sanders' Chicago Arrest Surfaces | NBC Chicago
Decision 2016

Decision 2016

Full coverage of the race for the White House

1963 Photo of Bernie Sanders' Chicago Arrest Surfaces

The Chicago Tribune released a photo of Sanders, then a University of Chicago student, being arrested at a protest on the city's South Side

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    Bloomberg via Getty Images
    Sen. Bernie Sanders/file photo.

    A decades-old photo showing the arrest of Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders during a 1963 protest on the South Side of Chicago surfaced Saturday, according to several reports.

    The Chicago Tribune released the photo from its archives Saturday morning. Sanders’ campaign confirmed the imaged showed the candidate as a 21-year-old student at the University of Chicago — then a civil rights activist — being taken by Chicago officers toward a police wagon in the Englewood neighborhood.

     

    We dug through our archives, and found this photo from 1963. Look closely. That's Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie...

    Posted by Chicago Tribune on Saturday, February 20, 2016

    "Bernie identified it himself," senior campaign adviser Tad Devine told the Tribune. "He looked at it — he actually has his student ID from the University of Chicago in his wallet — and he said, 'Yes, that indeed is (me).'"

    Also on Saturday, the campaign confirmed a video uploaded earlier in the week by a film company shows Sanders' arrest, The New York Times reported.

    Devine told the Times the candidate identified himself in the video, shared by Kartemquin Films, by the watch he is seen wearing.

    The footage also shows the Jan. 14, 1964 edition of the Chicago Tribune. The line, "Sanders was arrested Aug. 12 at 74th and Lowe and charged with resisting arrest" is highlighted in an article titled "Race Protest Cases of 159 are decided."

    According to both outlets, the protest was over segregation in Chicago Public Schools. Sanders was found guilty of resisting arrest and fined $25, the Tribune reports.

    He was a leader of the Congress of Racial Equality, a civil rights group, during his time at the University of Chicago, according to the Tribune.

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