"Danny's Law" Changes World of Recalls

Manufacturers of durable infant or toddler products now required to establish and maintain a registration card program

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    NEWSLETTERS

    New law requires manufacturers of durable infant or toddler products to establish and maintain a registration card program.

    A new weapon in the war against defective children's products was announced Thursday in Chicago, a city many consider to be at the center of the children's product safety movement.

    "Today we celebrate the Danny Keysar Child Product Safety Notification Act, which makes it easier for busy parents to learn of recalls and requires tough new standards that will stop dangerous products from reaching store shelves in the first places," said Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan.

    Chicago was the home of Danny Keysar, a little boy whose death has been a major catalyst for nationwide change, and whose name is on a key portion of the 2008 Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act.

    The act requires manufacturers of durable infant or toddler products to establish and maintain a registration card program.

    Manufacturers will have to include with the product a pre-postage-paid registration card, keep the records of consumers who register their products with the manufacturer for at least six years, and permanently place the manufacturer's name and contact information, model name and number, and the date of manufacture on each product.

    It affects 18 product categories: full-size cribs and non-full-size cribs, toddler beds, high chairs, booster chairs, hook-on chairs, bath seats, gates, play yards, stationary activity centers, infant carriers, strollers, walkers, swings, bassinets, cradles, children's folding chairs, changing tables, infant bouncers, infant bathtubs, portable toddler bed rails, and infant slings.

    Parents who buy products made after June 28, 2010 will get a registration card with the product. They can fill it out and mail it in, or register it on-line. That info can not be used for marketing purposes-- like the warranty cards of old. Manufacturers can only use the info provided to reach consumers if the product is recalled.

    Madigan joined Consumer Product Safety Commission Chair Inez Tenebaum in recognizing the courage of Danny's parents, Linda Ginzel and Boaz Keysar, for spending so many years after their loss dedicated to making safety changes.