Cheating 2.0 Enabled by Mobile Technology

Camera and Web access the new tools in a slacker's repertoire

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    The iPhone's touch-screen keyboard is easy to hide, with no clickety-clack keys to give cheaters away.

    A third of America's teens are turning to technology to help them with tests according to a study by the Benenson Strategy Group.

    Texting friends who send back answers, searching the Web using smartphones and photographing test sheets to make copies are some of the new techniques employed in schools around the country.

    Of course, using a graphing calculator to store formulas for math exams is decades old, and hiding notes in and around the body is as old as permanent ink.

    However, parents are at least partly to blame. While three quarters admit cheating is rampant, only three percent are willing to admit their own children do it.

    And of course, the kids wouldn't even have cell phones or access to them at school if it weren't for helicopter moms and dads who want to stay in constant contact. Not to mention the pressure to achieve in academia.

    But hey, would you rather your kid be looking up quiz questions on their iPhone or cramming during an Adderal-fueled all-nighter?

    If you want your kid to get into Harvard, your answer would probably be "both."

    Jackson West figures looking up answers online is actually the education these kids will need, not rote memorization.