Bieber May Not Have to Return to Court | NBC Chicago

Bieber May Not Have to Return to Court

Bieber has a second court date Monday – but he may not appear in court, Michael Grieco says

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    Justin Bieber could be a candidate for a diversionary program instead of going to court, according to a Miami Beach defense attorney who specializes in driving under the influence cases. NBC 6's Steve Litz reports. (Published Friday, Jan. 24, 2014)

    Justin Bieber could be a candidate for a diversionary program instead of going to court, according to a Miami Beach defense attorney who specializes in driving under the influence cases.

    “They have the opportunity to jump through some hoops, attend DUI school, sometimes they have a device placed on their vehicle, they have to attend certain classes,” attorney Michael Grieco said of people who go through diversionary programs.

    The pop star was arrested early Thursday after a drag-racing incident in a Miami Beach neighborhood, police said. Bieber was charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license and resisting arrest, and made his first appearance in bond court Thursday afternoon remotely via video from jail.

    Bieber has a second court date set for Monday, online Miami-Dade court records show. But he may not appear in court, Grieco said.

    “For the ministerial hearings, the calendar calls, the soundings, the arraignment, usually your lawyer can go on your behalf and you don't have to go, so there won't be a big circus in court,” Grieco said.

    With his arrest, Bieber joins a list of celebrities accused of drunk driving in South Beach, including actor Mickey Rourke, NFL player Donte’ Stallworth and Miami rapper Flo Rida.

    Grieco said seasoned DUI officers arrested Bieber, and were well aware of the attention it would draw.

    “Before they drafted their arrest affidavit there was a team of officers that made sure that the I's were dotted and the T's were crossed, and the punctuation was in the right place because they knew right away this was going to be a national news case,” Grieco said.