Gisele Bundchen Joins UN's 'Wild for Life' Fight Against Illegal Animal Trafficking | NBC Chicago

Gisele Bundchen Joins UN's 'Wild for Life' Fight Against Illegal Animal Trafficking

Soccer player Yaya Toure, actor Ian Somerhalder and more celebrities signed up, along with the supermodel

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    Gisele Bundchen, seen at Sao Paulo Fashion Week Summer 2014/2015, has joined the United Nation's 2016 "Wild for Life" campaign against illegal animal trafficking.

    Gisele Bundchen is fighting for sea turtles.

    The United Nations said Wednesday that the Brazilian supermodel has been named a goodwill ambassador as part of an unprecedented global campaign to fight the illegal trafficking of wildlife entitled "Wild for Life."

    "Knowledge is power and now is the time to set our minds to ending all illegal wildlife trade before the choice is no longer in our hands. Today, I am giving my name to change the game for sea turtles," Bundchen said in a statement.

    Bundchen, who is married to New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, announced her support Wednesday morning with an Instagram post featuring a picture of sea turtle superimposed over her face.

    The campaign, which was launched at the second United Nations Environment Assembly in Nairobi, has named a number of celebrities as goodwill ambassadors with each representing a separate species threatened by the illegal trade.

    Manchester City soccer player Yaya Toure is backing elephants and actor Ian Somerhalder is pulling for pangolins.

    Celebrities from China, India, Indonesia, Lebanon and Vietnam are also on board working to conserve orangutans, tigers, rhinos and helmeted hornbills and calling for citizen support to end the demand that is driving the illegal trade which enriches criminal networks and threatens peace and security around the globe.

    John Kay of Steppenwolf donated the use of the hit "Born to Be Wild" to the campaign.

    Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images

    The campaign also encourages people to go to its web site to find their own kindred species: https://wildfor.life/quiz.