Eagles of Death Metal Frontman Back in Paris to Finish Show | NBC Chicago

Eagles of Death Metal Frontman Back in Paris to Finish Show



    Members of the band Eagles of Death Metal, Jesse Hughes, right, and Julian Dorio pay their respects to 89 victims who died in a Nov. 13 attack, at the Bataclan concert hall in Paris, France, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015. Members of the California rock band Eagles of Death Metal are back at the ravaged Paris theater where they survived a massacre by Islamic extremist suicide bombers.

    Eagles of Death Metal frontman Jesse Hughes has returned to Paris, saying he feels a "sacred" responsibility to finish the band's show that was interrupted by gunfire, but adds that the terror attacks haven't changed his view on guns.

    Islamic extremists massacred 89 people at the band's Nov. 13 performance at the Bataclan, which has been closed since the attacks across Paris that left 130 dead and 350 others wounded.

    "There's been just such an outpouring of support for us and love for us. It's overwhelming. I just don't want to let anyone down," Hughes said of the band's upcoming performance at the Olympia Theatre in Paris on Tuesday.

    He made the remarks during an emotional interview with iTELE's Laurence Ferrari on Monday.

    "This show I'm supposed to put up like a barrier against anything that's not fun and that we're really just supposed to have fun there tomorrow. I think that's what we really need to do is just have fun together so that we can put some of this (expletive) behind us and really leave it there so it doesn't follow us around for the rest of our lives," Hughes said while breaking down into tears.

    Hughes told iTELE that he's been unable to control his emotions since the attacks.

    "I haven't had any nightmares and I've slept fine but when I'm awake is when I see things that are nightmares," he said.

    Asked if the trauma he and others experienced has changed his views on gun control, Hughes, co-founder of the band, said he believes everyone should be armed.

    "I think the only way that my mind has been changed is that maybe until nobody has guns everybody has to have them. Because I don't ever want to see anything like this ever happen again and I want everyone to have the best chance to live and I saw people die that maybe could have lived," he said.

    "I wish I knew for sure if they could have had a better chance because there were some real angels, real wonderful people in that show that aren't alive today and I really wish they were."