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Opinion: The Odds On The Gambling Bill

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Opinion: The Odds On The Gambling Bill

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Gov. Quinn Talks Gambling Expansion

Governor Quinn stopped by Studio 5 to discuss his position on expanding gambling in Illinois. He explained what's not up for compromise.

'Can't Gamble Your Way to Prosperity': Quinn

A day after he announced he would veto the current gambling bill, Gov. Pat Quinn stood firm on slimming down an Illinois gaming proposal to five casinos and refusing to add slot machines.
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Gov. Pat Quinn doesn’t like gambling.

But I do.

So I’m going to make book on what he’s likely to do about the gambling expansion bill on his desk. Quinn has three options: he can sign the bill, he can veto the bill, or he can do nothing. If he does nothing, then the bill -- which allows five new casinos, and slot machines and race tracks -- will become law.

QUINN SIGNS THE BILL, 1000-1: Quinn vetoed an early version of the bill, holding a press conference in January to condemn it as “flawed,” because it lacked oversight of casino operators. He is on record as telling supporters of the bill “don’t hold your breath” while waiting for him to sign. For Quinn to sign the bill would be a complete and craven reversal of his original position.

QUINN VETOS THE BILL, 1-1: This is the course of action legislators are expecting. In fact, they’re already trying to round up votes to override Quinn’s veto during the fall session, although House Speaker Michael Madigan doesn’t think that’s going to be possible. Quinn would look consistent, and he would once again show Mayor Rahm Emanuel, who lobbied for the gambling, who runs this state.

QUINN DOES NOTHING, 5-2: How often does a politician get a chance to do something while doing nothing? Not often! But under Illinois law, a governor can allow a law to pass just by ignoring it. This would seem like a tempting option for Quinn, who is often accused of being indecisive. But considering that doing nothing is tantamount to signing the bill, it’s not likely.

Related Topics Pat Quinn
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