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Lawmakers Consider Rule Change For Jackson Jr. Special Election

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-IL) addresses a news conference at the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 10, 2008.

    Lawmakers returned to Springfield Tuesday and plans are underway to adjust the rules for the special election to replace former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.  

    Gov. Pat Quinn needs legislative approval to move the date of the election from March 19, the tentative date he set Monday, to April 9, a date that would coincide with local general elections.   

    Candidates Line Up to Replace JJJr

    [CHI] Candidates Line Up to Replace JJJr
    Days after Jesse Jackson Jr. announced his resignation from Congress last Wednesday, the race to replace him has become increasingly crowded. Mary Ann Ahern reports. (Published Monday, Nov 26, 2012)

    The changes are part of House Amendment 1 to Senate Bill 338. Included in the bill will be various rules for candidates including number of signatures needed and filing dates. It’s expected to sail through the General Assembly for the governor to sign as early as Thursday.

    If the change goes through, candidates can begin circulating petitions next week and file with the State Board of Elections on Jan. 3, 4 or 7. The number of signatures is still being determined but may be 1,000. 

    Rooftop Pastor Talks About Running for JJJ's Seat

    [CHI] Rooftop Pastor Talks About Running for JJJ's Seat
    Pastor Corey Brooks, who became known as Chicago's "Rooftop Pastor," is considering a run for Former Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.'s seat. He stopped by NBC 5 to talk about his possible plans, when he will make an announcement and his thought about Jackson's resignation. (Published Sunday, Nov 25, 2012)

    Those who want to run as an Independent will have until Feb. 4 to file but they most likely will need between 9,000 and 10,000 signatures.  

    No doubt there will be challenges to the candidates' signatures, so candidates will need far more than the number required, perhaps double or triple, to make sure their name makes it to the ballot.