Police Developing New Strategy to Combat Crime, Emanuel Says | NBC Chicago
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Police Developing New Strategy to Combat Crime, Emanuel Says

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Many people gathered at Old St. Patrick's Church to speak out against the recent spike in crimes. NBC 5's Natalie Martinez reports. (Published Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016)

    Mayor Emanuel said police are turning to a new strategy to address the spike in crimes during the month of January.

    Chicago crime is up this January compared to last January at an alarming rate. Chicago police statistics show murders are up 93 percent, while shootings are up 171 percent. During an 11-hour time span just this past Monday, 16 people were shot – 5 fatally.

    "I believe the increase in the shooting, the increase in the gun violence, the onus of that is on the gangs and illegal flow of guns into the hands of criminals,” Emanuel said.

    The change in crime fighting strategy means 275 officers will move into patrol cars to increase visibility.

    Police Developing New Strategies to Combat Crime, Emanuel Says

    [CHI] Police Developing New Strategies to Combat Crime, Emanuel Says
    Mayor Emanuel said police are turning to new strategies to address the spike in crimes during the month of January. NBC 5's Mary Ann Ahern reports. (Published Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016)

    “You are going to see more of the officers in the impact zones are now going to mobile, not just on feet to cover more territory," Emanuel said.

    The mayor does not believe police are laying back after the scrutiny from the Laquan McDonald shooting.

    “The people responsible are not the police officers, I put the responsibility on the gangbangers who are pulling the triggers," Emanuel said.

    Meanwhile, activists say the solution must include job creation for those who live in the neighborhoods most impacted.

    "If we have nothing to offer them but hey you got to change your ways, you got to put down the guns, you got to stop selling drugs, fine. If they say yes to all of that, what next," Father Michael L. Pfleger said.

    Dozens from all backgrounds came together Thursday evening at Old St. Pats church to speak out against the violence.

    "The theme of the night was "enough is enough. No more violence," Rev. Booker Vance of Faith in Place said.

    At the Steve Harvey studios, guests arrived to tell their stories for an upcoming episode on Chicago violence.

    Among them was Rochetta Tyler who lost her daughter to gun violence. She brought her ashes to the taping.

    "We need help," Tyler said. "I just want my baby back, and I know I can't get her back."

    The Fraternal Order of Police has yet to respond to NBC Chicago’s request for comment.

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