New Polls, New Attacks in Final Week of Mayors Race | NBC Chicago
Ward Room
Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

New Polls, New Attacks in Final Week of Mayors Race

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Just one week to go until the city election and new polling shows Mayor Emanuel is short of the votes he needs to avoid a runoff. NBC Chicago’s political reporter Mary Ann Ahern has the latest campaign update. (Published Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015)

    With one week to go until the city election, new polling shows Mayor Emanuel is short of the votes he needs to avoid a runoff, and challenger Jesus “Chuy” Garcia is suggesting if Emanuel wins, Chicago teachers will strike again.

    If Mayor Emanuel doesn't get the 50 percent-plus-one-vote he needs on Election Day he will be the first mayor to face an April runoff since the city changed its voting system to get rid of having to declare a political party affiliation.

    Emanuel said he had no campaign schedule Tuesday and instead carried out his mayoral duties.

    Both public events he attended involved announcing taxpayer money for necessary city projects.

    “I’m going to make sure the people of the city of Chicago know that after the last four years we made a basic pledge that we would take on the issues holding the city back,” Emanuel said.

    A new poll by the Chicago Tribune released Tuesday showed Emanuel at 45 percent, Jesus “Chuy” Garcia at 20 percent and 18 percent undecided.

    Willie Wilson and Bob Fioretti are tied at seven percent with William Dock Walls at two percent.

    Garcia, who added close to $200,000 TV advertisements for these final days, suggested that if Emanuel wins the election the city may see a second teachers’ strike.

    “He is a confrontation type of mayor,” Garcia said. “He’s hard-headed and he thinks he can impose his will on everyone.”

    Willie Wilson is hoping to attract more jobs to Chicago through inviting an international sporting competition.

    “The important thing is that young people stay in a positive mode,” Wilson said. “So that they can look forward to the future, and this is what we're all about."

    As for Ald. Bob Fioretti, he knows its crunch time.

    “I’m sick and tired of seeing what I see in this city,” Fioretti said. “I stand up for the people this administration leaves behind."

    Get the latest from NBC Chicago anywhere, anytime

    • Download the App

      Available for IOS and Android