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Halvorson and Jackson Raise Spectre of Obama, Blago

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Halvorson and Jackson Raise Spectre of Obama, Blago

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The race for Congress in the 2nd District is not about President Barack Obama.  

It’s also not about former Governor Rod Blagojevich. 

Or is it?

In the  very nasty campaign Jesse Jackson Jr. and Debbie Halvorson are throwing all they’ve got at one another.

Jackson, who has received permission from the White House, photo-shopped the President’s picture to show his endorsement alongside him for many billboards.

Now he has a new radio that uses Halvorson’s words to blame Obama for her Congressional defeat in 2010, and that's made her upset.   

“I’ve stood with President Obama,” she adds “I voted for the health care bill, and could have been part of the reason I lost in 2010.  I never, ever blamed the president.”  

Jackson had an earlier campaign ad that said Halvorson has voted against President Obama 88 times.  However the Congressional Quarterly  researched that claim and says it is Jackson who has voted twice as often against Obama than Halvorson did.

Jackson is under investigation by the House Ethics Committee. They're looking into what alleged role – if any – he played in attempting to buy the Obama senate seat.   And as former Governor Rod Blagojevich prepares for prison, Jackson says “I keep his family in my prayers.”   Blagojevich and Jackson served with one another in congress.  

He adds “it’s a difficult period for the state of Illinois. 
   
Halvorson – not one to waste a good crisis – adds   “It’s that fine line of ethics.  And people have asked me why is it Governor Blagojevich is going to jail for 14 years but nothing has happening to Mr. Jackson because they tie the two of them together.” 

As Jackson’s handlers shouted “we have to get to our next sight”  Jackson responds to whether Blagojevich received a fair sentence by saying “it’s not my position to comment on the judges and the system.”

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