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Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

George Ryan Writing Tell-All Memoir: Report

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George Ryan returned to his Kankakee home hours after he was released from prison in Indiana and checked into a halfway house in Chicago. Jim Thompson talks to the media as Ryan's family looks on. At one point, Ryan peeks out the front door.

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George Ryan "Paid A Severe Price:" Jim Thompson

Former Gov. Jim Thompson said his friend George Ryan "paid a severe price" when he was convicted and imprisoned. "The loss of his wife and brother while he was in the penitentiary, the loss of his pension, his office, his good name. That is a significant punishment."

Ryan's Road to Prison: A Review

Former Gov. George Ryan spent the last six years in prison on a corruption conviction. Phil Rogers looks back on what got him there.
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Former Gov. George Ryan may spill long-buried Springfield secrets in a tell-all book.

Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed reports the once-imprisoned governor is writing his memoir, and Ryan's son calls it a "humdinger.”

George Homer Ryan told Sneed readers should prepare for a "no-holds-barred book" that's expected to name names and "tell it like it is."

Ryan served in state government for 40 years and spent nearly six years in prison in Terre Haute, Ind., for corruption. He was released from prison in January and bypassed staying at a halfway house to return to the Kankakee home he shared with his wife, who passed away while Ryan was in prison.

Ryan works at his son's insurance company and must report to the Chicago halfway home weekly.

After Ryan's release, his close friend and former Gov. Jim Thompson said he will "go forward with his life the best he can."

"He has paid a severe price," Thompson said. "The loss of his wife and brother while he was in the penitentiary. The loss of his pension, his office, his good name. Five-and-a-half years of imprisonment, now near 80 years old, that is a significant punishment, but he's going to go forward with his life the best he can."

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