Ward Room
Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

Del Valle Finishes Third

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    NEWSLETTERS

    "The poorest candidate with the most to offer" concedes the mayor's race but says he remains committed to bringing change to Chicago. (Published Tuesday, Feb 22, 2011)

    Miguel del Valle’s run for Chicago mayor is over.

    The Chicago City Clerk was the first candidate to announce his bid after retiring Mayor Richard Daley said he would not seek re-election, but that eagerness didn’t translate to a first-place finish.

    With 98 percent of precincts reporting at 10 p.m., the city clerk claimed just 9 percent of the vote.

    The most liberal candidate of the bunch, 59-year-old Del Valle pledged more jobs for the disabled and more support for young people going to school, including more financial aid for undocumented students. His plan encouraged high schoolers to take City College courses for credit before enrolling at a university.

    Del Valle gained popularity earlier this year when he took a stand against the city's parking fees and ticketing. He vowed to reverse the city's parking meter contract through an undiscovered loophole and to increase the number of tickets required before motorists get the boot.

    His supporters praised Del Valle as the "underdog" representing the "little guy." He campaigned as the poorest candidate in the race.

    But he was rich with support. Del Valle snagged endorsements from the Independent Voters of Illinois-Independent Precinct Organization, Parent PAC, Teachers for Social Justice and three members of the Illinois General Assembly.

    Support from outside of the Latino voter base proved vital for his campaign, but Del Valle bowed to Gery Chico, who emerged as the consensus Latino candidate for mayor with endorsements from Latino alderman George Cardenas and Joe Moreno.

    Del Valle was consistently behind Chico and Rahm Emanuel during the race. A poll conducted by the Chicago Retail Merchants Association on February 13 showed Del Valle in third place with just over 10 percent of the vote.