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Chicago Speed Cameras Nab 205,000 in Test Run

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The cameras, which operated under a pilot program between August 26 and October 3, issued warnings to 205,000 drivers. Mary Ann Ahern reports. (Published Friday, Oct 11, 2013)

    Zoooooom. 

    That's the sound Chicago drivers made as they sped past cameras in nine test zones around Chicago. The cameras, which operated under a pilot program between August 26 and October 3, issued warnings to 205,000 drivers, according to a WBEZ Analysis

    Had this been an active situation rather than the pilot program, and actual tickets were being issued, the city would have realized $13.9 million in revenue during the brief run. 

    The city plans to install about 105 cameras at 50 locations around the city. If the trend from the test cameras continue, experts say the city could reap more than $100 million in revenue from the cameras this year. 

    The city, however, says that figure is too high. They claim the cameras act as a deterrent and that speeding violations will decrease with this added enforcement.  For evidence, they told WBEZ that more than 7,000 citations were issued on the first day all nine cameras were active, and less than a month later that figure fell to just below 4,000 citations. 

    Each camera offers a 30-day grace period in which drivers will recieve only warnings for the speed violations. 

    Once the cameras begin issuing real tickets, which could happen as soon as Oct. 21drivers caught going 6-10 mph over the speed limit will get a $35 ticket, and those exceeding the limit by 11 mph or more will be fined $100. Compare that to New York City, where new speed cameras also were installed. The fine is $50 for driving 10 miles or more over the speed limit.

     

    Chicago Department of Transportation "will notify the public several days in advance of the start of enforcement.”

    Read more at WBEZ.