Ward Room
Covering Chicago's nine political influencers

Chicago City Council: Michael Chandler

Ousted alderman returns to the 24th ward, and this time he is working toward infrastructure and job creation

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    NEWSLETTERS

    24th Ward Alderman Michael Chandler

    Michael Chandler has done this before.

    Serving nearly 12 years as the 24th ward alderman, he was booted out by a newcomer in 2007. Four years later, there seemed to be buyer's remorse in the ward. Chandler is now out to prove he knows how to take care of the 24th ward.

    Background: Chandler is a long time resident of Chicago. He attended Harold Washington City College. He worked for the Building Department. Chandler served a 12-year span as 24th ward Alderman from 1995 to 2007, before Sharon Dixon beat him. In 2011, Chandler beat Dixon and 23 other challengers in the big race for the aldermanic seat.

    The Ward: The 24th ward incorporates parts of North Lawndale, West Garfield and South Austin. The area is one of the largest neighborhoods in the city. It is highly diverse and has a large working class. Sears, Roebuck and Co. was a big part of the economic development in the area and when the company, moved the population declined and the economic prosperity decreased. Things are picking up in the ward and retail developments, like grocery stores and a cinema, are emerging.

    The Office: Ald. Chandler is a believer in creating jobs and working on infrastructure. He supported council committee consolidation and also supports an inspector general for the council. He secured a Dominick's grocery store and got rid of the "Mount Henry" garbage pile.

    Committees:
    Budget and Government Operations
    Economic, Capital and Technology Development
    Housing and Real Estate
    Human Relations
    License and Consumer Protection
    Joint Committee on Economic, Capital and Technology Development and Health and Environmental Protection

    Information: City of Chicago, Office of the City Clerk, Chicago Sun-Times and  newcommunities.org,