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Roald Dahl's "BFG" Heading for Big Screen

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Roald Dahl's "BFG" Heading for Big Screen

Roald Dahl's works have been film fodder for decades, with the finished product having been at times great. Now one of his lesser works is getting adapted for a second time.

"The BFG," aka the big friendly giant, was first brought to life in 1989, but now "E.T." writer Melissa Mathison will take another crack at adapting it, reported The Wrap. Mathison, who was previously married to Harrison Ford, hasn't had a screenplay produced since 1997 "Kundun," let's hope she's got something left in the tank.

Originally published in 1982, "BFG" tells the story of an orphan, Sophie, who is snatched from her bed by a giant who brings her back to Giant Country, where he mixes up dreams to blow through his trumpet into the ears of sleeping children. Sophie and BFG must go to battle with the other giants, who have plans to eat the other kids. Naturally, the Queen and the RAF become involved.

"BFG" is being produced for DreamWorks by Kathleen Kennedy and Frank Marshall, the duo who helped bring Jason Bourne to movie life.

Dahl's works have been trued into such film as "Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory" and more recently "The Fantastic Mr. Fox," among others. He also wrote "James and the Giant Peach," "Matilda" and "Chitty-Chitty Bang-Bang." You really should read his short stories, too, which are insanely creepy and definitely not for kids.

And did you know that he flew fighter planes in WW II? Or that he was married to screen legend Patricia Neal? Or that his former writing hut is sinking? Interesting guy.

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